Information About Lady's Mantle


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Lady’s Mantle Plant Division – When To Divide Lady’s Mantle Plants

By Liz Baessler

Lady's mantle plants can be grown as perennials, and with each growing season they spread out a little more. So what do you do when your patch of lady's mantle is getting too big for its own good? Learn more about how and when to divide lady's mantle plants here.

Lady’s Mantle In A Pot – How To Grow Lady’s Mantle In Containers

By Liz Baessler

Lady?s mantle is a low growing herb that produces delicate wisps of clustered yellow flowers. While historically used medicinally, today it is mostly grown for its flowers which are attractive in borders, cut flower arrangements, and in containers. Learn more here.


Petrea Species, Bluebird Vine, Queen's Wreath, Sandpaper Vine

Family: Verbenaceae (ver-be-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Petrea (PEE-tree-uh) (Info)
Species: volubilis (vol-OO-BIL-iss) (Info)
Synonym:Petrea arborea
Synonym:Petrea aspera
Synonym:Petrea racemosa
Synonym:Petrea subserrata

Category:

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round in hardiness zone

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are good for cutting

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed sow indoors before last frost

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Collect seedhead/pod when flowers fade allow to dry

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Citrus Heights, California

Saint Petersburg, Florida(2 reports)

Sarasota, Florida(2 reports)

Hawaiian Paradise Park, Hawaii

Orchidlands Estates, Hawaii

Saint Helena Island, South Carolina

Christiansted, Virgin Islands

Gardeners' Notes:

On Mar 25, 2017, Spiderplantwali from Katy, TX wrote:

Neutral so far because I have just purchased this vine. Will it flower if I plant it beneath a pine tree?

On Sep 17, 2016, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

This species may be grown in a container, but where it isn't hardy it needs a greenhouse or conservatory to overwinter. Though it's fast growing and can reach 40', it is often maintained as a standard or espalier. Needs a strong support. Can be grown on a fence.

Once established in the landscape, this twining climber will tolerate drought. Usually evergreen, it may lose most of its leaves during the dry season (central Mexico) and re-grow them after the first flush of flowering.

The flowers sprays last several days as a (short) cut flower
if the base of the spray itself is cut. They wilt immediately if any woody stem is included.

There is a white-flowered cultivar, 'Alba'.

This species is not known to be invasive. In sout. read more h Florida, it rarely produces seeds.

On Jun 14, 2014, jendive from Coral Terrace, FL wrote:

Mine grew very quickly and flowered profusely on a trellis while it was getting full sun. As soon as some nearby trees started blocking some light, I noticed it flowered a bit less. There can be a lot of leaves for a patio, but because they are sandpaper like, relatively easy to clean up (doesn't "stick"). My neighbors all enjoy the show of flowers. Can anyone advise how often I should cut it back hard in South Florida? Once a year in the winter?

On Apr 6, 2013, marshtackie from Orlando, FL wrote:

Didn't know this was supposed to be a Zone 10/11 plant. Admired a plant of it at Leu Gardens in Orlando, so I bought a plant at a garden center. Well, Leu Gardens is in Zone 9, as am I, so I might get lucky. It is just the right shade of lavender/purple to go with a Marйchal Niel rose or a Paul's Lemon Pillar.

On Jul 31, 2011, FlaFlower from Titusville, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

I can't get this vine to bloom for love of the color green, have had it 2 years, taken over a good portion of the fence, had no problems down to 20 degrees, kept every leaf, never a single flower. very disappointed, the vine by itself is not worth keeping, not attractive, stiff and hard to handle when trying to train on a chain link.

Well I take that back from 2011, once it started blooming it hasn't stopped it always has blooms on it now, sometimes just a few and like this time of year at the end of winter it is covered in a huge display, glad I waited to hack and spray

On Apr 14, 2011, anhinga from North Fort Myers, FL wrote:

I saw this vine at the Edison/Ford Winter Estates in Ft Myers, FL and purchased a 6" pot there last fall. It's growing beautifully and has bloomed the first year. It's just gorgeous. The one growing at the Estates is on a stone chimney and is really stunning.

On Mar 23, 2011, nalin1 from New Delhi,
India (Zone 10a) wrote:

A great flowering vine for New Delhi (zone 10 a) flowers more as the plant grows older, and the intensity of the colors also deepen. Begins to flower in early to mid March, and in about 2 weeks flowers quite profusely. A worthwhile addition to the garden--needs a lot of sun to flower well.

On Mar 7, 2011, bioramani from Bangalore,
India wrote:

blooming madly in Bangalore, India. Tends to grow out of hand. Leaves are very scratchy. When dropped from a height or strewn in a light wind, individual flowers spin and dance wonderfully.

Great plant. Have to watch it though. Before you know what is happening it is all over the place.

On Feb 28, 2011, aldaflower from Freedom, ME wrote:

I have the alba form of Petrea volubilis for Wedding work. It was originally purchased from Logees and stays year round in the dome which does not go below 40 degrees F. It began minimally flowering after two years and is now, year 3, in a much larger container. All leaves drop in the Fall. At present it gives me hope for wonderful flowers this, 2011, year :)!

On Feb 19, 2011, victorengel from Austin, TX wrote:

I saw this plant quite a bit in Mexico and Guatemala. Feeling nostalgic, I ordered one, and it's been struggling with our high pH water and soil here. I knew it was an acid lover when I got it, so this is not a surprise. I'll try to give it better acidic conditions this year.

The good news is that it's blooming now, not long after it was outside in temperatures in the 20s -- in an unprotected pot. I did move it to the greenhouse before the two big cold spells we had this winter that went down to the mid-teens.

On Mar 13, 2010, xaia from Kitchener,
Canada wrote:

I just received the seeds of this plant from Seeds & More, based in Newfoundland, Canada. The shipping was fast and the seeds arrived safely and with detailed growing instructions provided. The seeds are larger than what I had anticipated so germination will be quite the experience to witness! I'm definitely gonna post again on the progress! Hopefully they come up hassle free!!

On Feb 7, 2010, Dedda from Petersburg, VA (Zone 7a) wrote:

Had mine for 3 years, now the trunk is over a 1/2 inch thick(a requirement for blooming) and this week she did!Yipee !
Grown on back porch/mudroom about 6 feet from an overhead 4 tube fixture , light runs 8 hours a day
Container grown (zone 7B) kept on the dry side.
Leaves will turn very brittle and fall off it kept TOO dry - leaves wont wilt as an early indicator, they are rather stiff to start with. but it recovers well from neglect!
'Well behaved' for a vine. only trimmed once in three years, stays within a 3-4 ft range- might be do to pot size( 10 inch).

On Jun 10, 2009, FLStu from Effingham, SC (Zone 8a) wrote:

Bought this at a local plant festival. Was told by the vendor that she had the plant in my zone 9a (her town just being east of me). However, this winter we had one of the coldest in a long time with record lows. THe Petrea did not survive :( I did not cover as I was told it would come back up if cold damaged.

On Jan 11, 2009, TrixieM from Mc Call Creek, MS wrote:

To find the seeds: Wait until the flowers begin turning green and then brown. There will be a little knot under the center of the flower. Remove the petals and crack the little knot out of its shell. There is your seed.

I've grown a number of these from seed. The seed needs to be notched to enable the little embryo to escape. I use (very carefully) the tiny pointed end of a fingernail file.

These dried flowers are so neat when they fly like little helicopter rotors whirling to sow their little seeds!

One of my very favorite plants!

On Nov 11, 2008, amygirl from Lafayette, IN (Zone 5a) wrote:

It is easily grown by taking semi-hardwood cuttings. The thicker diameter cuttings root faster.

On Mar 3, 2008, art4gardens from Zephyrhills, FL wrote:

This plant grows well and hardy! I have attempted to root cuttings, old wood and new wood, as well as airlayering. No luck. I was told to plant the seeds. Now if I knew how to find them on my plant, I would try. Any ideas what they look like or where they might be found on the plant? I have tried finding them within the flowers, no luck.

On Mar 27, 2005, JaxFlaGardener from Jacksonville, FL (Zone 8b) wrote:

This plant was offered in the end of the season sale last Fall at a local nursery. The nursery staff referred to the plant as a "wisteria," which it obviously wasn't. I had no idea what it was until it bloomed this year. I used the Plant ID Forum on DG to find out its botanical name with the help of other DG members. The nursery was probably referring to the common name, "Tropical Wisteria," and I misunderstood.

The plant somehow managed to survive this winter with no special protection and tolerated temperatures as low as 28 F on a few nights with no apparent damage. I think, though, that I was just lucky in that I had planted it near the fence in a semi-shady location and my hedges probably offered some protection from winds which made the temperature lower than 28 F . read more with the wind chill factor.

Now that I know what it is, I plan to move it to full sun in my garden and provide a temporary visqueen plastic greenhouse enclosure during the winter months (as I do with some other tender tropicals) and hope that I can someday see the fantastic floral displays shown in the photos here.

Update: January 21,2008. I never got around to moving the P. volubilis. It has continued to thrive in the location where I originally planted it. It still survives a few nights each winter with temperatures below freezing. I think the wind-break and insulation of the Japanese Yew (Podocarpus sp.) hedges that it is planted against provides protection from the freezes. I also typically toss some twinkle lights and a blanket over it on the coldest nights. However, I'm beginning to think it may be more cold hardy than the zones provided above. It has now grown so large that I can't cover all the arching limbs. I've never seen and frost or freeze damage to those limbs and leaves that hang stick out beyond the cover I can provide. I think this plant has great possibilities for more extensive use in Zones 8b/9a. It would certainly make a nice container grown plant in areas even further north. I am on a quest to get one of the white-flowering varieties of this wonderful plant.

On Apr 19, 2004, TheWildchild from Candler, NC (Zone 6b) wrote:

Easy to grow/maintain.Great for beginner gardeners.
Spectacular show when in bloom.
Bees and Butterflies are attracted to this vine.
Watering Needs: Keep moist until the plant is established, regular water thereafter.
Be sure to prune this vine after blooming to encourage another show!

On Apr 24, 2003, Monocromatico from Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil (Zone 11) wrote:

This plant keeps its atractive violet calix even after the flowering season.

On Mar 9, 2003, IslandJim from Keizer, OR (Zone 8b) wrote:

wonderful, well-behaved vine. spectacular in bloom, although the season is short.


Good filler plant for front of border

Hello there Now is an ideal time to plant Alchemilla mollis. Container-grown hardy perennials can be planted at any time of the year really, except when the soil is frozen or waterlogged. I have attached a link from our website with information on planting perennials http://www.crocus.co.uk/features/_/how-to-garden/planting-successfully/planting-perennials/articleid.1165/ Hope this helps Georgina Plant Doctor

Plant suggestions for a child's 'Fairy Garden' Sirs, Having recently cleared and replanted much of my garden my 11 year old daughter has asked for her own plot to create a "fairy garden". I love the idea of her looking after her own area, and she will also help, and have part of the vegetable plot. However I am stuck as to which plants (shrubs, perennials or otherwise) to suggest for the fairy garden. The plot she has selected is above the waterfall. The soil is a little heavy but other than that quite good, but it is in the shade of a large sycamore tree. Can you suggest any shade tolerant plants for this area? In case it helps, it sits next to a Japanese inspired area. The area is approximately 2m square, but if you have any ideas that might need more space that is also OK . Thank you.

Hello There, This is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil underneath the tree. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are your best options Epimedium http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.epimedium/ Helleborus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.helleborus/ Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I'm not sure if the fairies will love them, but I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Plants for a demanding site! Hi We are looking for a ready-made border for a demanding site. The area is in shade with trees, the soil is clay, and is dry in summer and in the winter. We are wanting, if possibly for it to flower in the spring, summer, autumn, and winter! The area to cover is three areas of 5mtrs x 2mtrs - it is a new border, and we want to have some height at the back of the border. Thank you

Hello There, We do offer a bespoke planting plan service, but this is charged at ??30 per hour - just click on the following link for more information. http://www.crocus.co.uk/design-service/ I'm afraid though, dry shade is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. You should also keep in mind too that to get a really good floral display, you will need to have a more open, sunny spot - think woodland floors that rarely get the sun, which might have ferns and greenery, but very few flowers. Here are your best options:- Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Planting ideas for under large Cedar trees Hi, We have a garden that has about 10 large cedar trees in it. The garden doesn't contain any plants other than a small yew and holly tree. The soil looks acidic. The garden has not been used or maintained for many, many, years hence pine needles, and cones have just been left to rot down. We have cleaned up as much as we can and cut some of the lower branches off the Cedars. Now our problem is what will grow? We need a hedge, preferably evergreen and quick growing (not leylandii). Also we need ground cover, - we would like grass but are unsure whether it will grow. Is there any way we can pretty this garden up with some evergreens and perennials without too much hassle? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. Nadine

Hello Nadine, I'm afraid it is going to be pretty difficult to get anything to grow under mature Cedars as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are your best options:- Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/result/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Plants for a sunny border to compliment a tangerine coloured Rose. Hi, I have a newly built patio, which incorporates a 5 metre by just over 1 metre bed, south facing in full sun. (when the sun shines!) I have already purchased 8 tangerine roses which I had thought to underplant with some Alchemilla mollis. but I am at a bit of a loss. I had thought to make it very bright with the tangerine/lime colourway but maybe I need to add some dark purple leaved Heuchera? Do they like full sun? Also I would have liked some height at the back. On the north length of the bed is the patio, on the south length are two oak sleeper holding back a raised lawn. Can you please help me, I started off doing my purchases from you but really I need some professional advice as to what will work together. The 8 rose bushes are the only purchase so far. Regards

Hello There, I like all your ideas and think it will look very dramatic. Both the Alchemilla and the Heucheras will flourish in full sun or partial shade so they should be absolutely fine. I would not go for anything else too tall as the roses are only reasonably compact and will prefer not to have too much competition, however you could put in a few dark purple Penstemons such as P. Raven to add a bit of height. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/perennials/penstemon-raven/classid.7316/ I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

Plants for under hedges? Hello, I have two hedges that are only a year old - mostly hawthorn, hazel, wild rose and crab apple. A lot of grasses have grown up into and around them. I am about to weed all this out and was wondering what I could plant underneath to prevent the grasses coming up again in the spring. I was having a look at your perennial prism - what would be good to plant now? I live in Scotland so am a bit worried about the frosts. I would like to get something planted before the spring as we will be moving. Many thanks for your help, Jessica

Hello Jessica, I'm afraid it is incredibly difficult to get plants to grow under a hedge as the competition for light, water and nutrients is too fierce. Your best bet would be really tough plants, but even these will have a struggle on their hands, and they will not be very colourful. Here are your best options Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Iris foetidissima http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3073&CategoryID= Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Evergreen ground cover for under trees Hello, I want to under-plant the five silver birches in our back garden. The soil is fairly dry under the trees, clay based, with morning sun on the front edge of the border but otherwise shady. I want an evergreen cover, low maintenance, with foliage rather than flowers. I am thinking about planting solidly with Pachysandra terminalis, with maybe some ferns to provide a bit of height at the base of the fence. Any alternative ideas would be gratefully appreciated. Regards Janette

Dear Helen Thanks for your suggestions. I think I will add in the Liriope in clumps towards the back. Best wishes Janette

Hello There, This is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. I like the idea of the Pachysandra and ferns, but you could also consider any of the following. Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Suggestions for dry shade under a tree Hello, I have a raised bed around the base of a twisted willow about 1.5metres diameter. Currently I have foxgloves, tulips and day lilies growing, which cope, but all flower early in the year. I've yet to find anything that will cope with these conditions that will flower later and keep the bed looking interesting. It gets a little morning sun on one side but is otherwise in the shade all day and is very dry. We live in France and that is not helping as we get very little rain in the summer and it is often very hot. Please can you help? Pauline

Hello There, This is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are the best options for UK gardens - I am not sure how they will cope in your French garden. Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Plants for under a tree Hi, I am looking for plants that will survive under a tree with soil that is fairly dry, any recommendations? I would quite like to put grasses or hostas there but not sure if there are any varieties which would suit that environment! Regards Sue

Hello There, This is a very difficult situation for plants as there will be very little moisture and nutrients in the soil. The best plants will be the toughest, however even these will need to be kept really well fed and watered if they are to survive. Here are your best options Euonymus fortunei varieties http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=euonymus+for Alchemilla mollis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=233&CategoryID= Pachysandra terminalis http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3288&CategoryID= Bergenias http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=bergenia Lamiums http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?CommonName=lamium Liriope muscari http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=3173&CategoryID= Cotoneaster dammeri http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ContentType=Plant_Card&ClassID=1021&CategoryID= I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Help for a shady damp spot please Hi I'm looking for plants for a damp shady spot in my garden. It's a raised, north-facing bed and stays damp most of the year, and the soil is compost-rich. I'd love to get some colour in there as I look out on to it from my kitchen window so I was wondering about Hollyhocks, Flag Irises or maybe Heuchera? I also have a very big slug problem though - tried Sambucus nigra last year and it was eaten! Please, what can you suggest? I look forward to hearing from you. Kind regards Mary

Hello Mary, Most flowering plants prefer a sunnier spot, and few plants can cope if the soil remains too wet, however you could consider any of the following Alchemilla http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.alchemilla/ Ferns http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/ferns/plcid.309/ Helleborus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.helleborus/ Hydrangea http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.hydrangea/ Persicaria http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.persicaria/ Rhododendron http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.rhododendron/ Vinca http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.vinca/ I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor


10. If all else fails, you can fake it with a faux fiddle-leaf fig tree.

Above: A 6 Foot Faux Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree has broad leaves, poseable branches, and textured “bark.” It is $179.99 at World Market.

Looks life-like, no? Just don’t check the undersides of those plastic leaves…

For more growing tips, see Fiddle Leaf Fig Trees: A Field Guide to Planting, Care & Design in our curated design guides to Houseplants 101. Read more:


Watch the video: Codys Father And Son Day Song + More Nursery Rhymes u0026 Kids Songs - CoComelon


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